‘Noah’ a bizarre film full of oddness

September 19, 2014 Review Print Print
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I’m not usually one to bash movies and write about it, but today I’m feeling disappointed about a particular film I was exposed to.

“Noah” is a bizarre film about the well-known biblical character and his endeavors as a God-fearing man in an antagonizing world.

In the movie, Noah leads his family across the gray desolation that is presumably eastern Turkey.

Noah meets some interesting friends along the way, like ‘The Watchers’ who are fallen angels who have taken form in the Earth’s rocks, creating monstrous beings. These are the creatures Noah convinces to help him build the ark.

Throughout the film, symbolic and random bursts of Noah’s visions show such scenes as Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden plucking the forbidden fruit, a snake shedding its skin, and Cain killing Abel, which Noah seems to reflect on to reaffirm his purpose in creating the ark. One scene shows Noah’s terrifying visions of drowning in a sea with the sounds of people screaming.

As the film progresses, all sorts of birds, snakes, gazelles — basically every animal — load themselves onto the ark in pairs to prepare for the great flood.

The flood waters, however, don’t come only from the skies.

They also emerge from the ground, which makes the Earth flood much faster.

One thing is for sure: anyone who watches this movie will have a surprising and maybe even confusing time seeing the events of Noah’s ark unfold. It’s much more dramatic, horrific and brutal than the Sunday school version of the story, which makes it more interesting and mind-blowing.

The cast, by the way, is amazing, which confused me even more. Russel Crowe plays Noah, Jennifer Connelly plays Noah’s wife Naameh, Logan Lerman plays Noah’s son Ham, Douglas Booth as Ham’s brother Shem, and Emma Watson plays Ila, Noah’s adopted child.

My biggest question throughout the film was “what compelled these amazing actors to be in this bizarre story?”

But then I quickly realized that any obligated Christian in the nation would pay to see it, which means big money. Maybe I’m not seeing the full picture with this film, but I tried really hard to justify why I watched it and I just couldn’t find a reason.

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