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Writer gives kudos to Hobby Lobby

Standing up for what you believe in can often be a risky battle. Countless people will ridicule you, judge you and even tell you have no reason to have a belief that is different than theirs.

Hobby Lobby has been scrutinized relentlessly by the government, media and average citizens alike for taking a stance against parts of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

Hobby Lobby is a Christian, family-owned corporation, meaning chances are, their beliefs do not line up with the majority of the government or the majority of Americans outside of the Bible belt.

Lucky for them, most of their 556 locations are located in the South, so they have a good number of supporters — like me.

The controversy surrounding Hobby Lobby started because Obamacare requires employers to provide insurance coverage for IUDs such as Mirena or morning after pills, such as “Plan B.” Employers also have to provide coverage for contraceptives such as condoms or birth control.

According to www.washingtonpost.com, the popular assumption that Hobby Lobby does not want to offer any contraceptives is not true. Hobby Lobby is simply against morning after pills and IUDs, which are only two ways available to prevent a pregnancy.

The Green family founded Hobby Lobby with Christ-like principles. Their view on life — that it begins at the moment of fertilization — is the reason they are in disagreement with offering “emergency contraceptives.” Offering forms of contraceptives that would not support that view would be hypocritical of the company.

Hobby Lobby is facing paying government fines of up to $1.3 million per day because of their refusal to comply with government regulations, according to CNN.

Founder and CEO of Hobby Lobby, David Green said, “By being required to make a choice between sacrificing our faith or paying millions of dollars in fines, we essentially must choose which poison pill to swallow. We simply cannot abandon our religious beliefs to comply with this mandate.”

In essence, Hobby Lobby should be able to exercise its religious freedom regardless of it being a corporation. Each company is founded with a set of principles and theirs is no different.

How can the government justify making a business comply with a law that does, in fact, hinder their religious freedom?

The Religious Freedom Restoration Act was passed in 1933 and states, “Government shall not substantially burden a person’s exercise of religion even if the burden results from a rule of general applicability.”

Hobby Lobby should not be required to pay fines or offer medical insurance to cover things they don’t support.

Sure, this could be an inconvenience to women should Hobby Lobby prevail, but, even then, there are three easy solutions to the problem: don’t work for Hobby Lobby, use the types of contraceptives their insurance covers or simply refrain from having sex.

Whether you agree with Hobby Lobby about their stance on contraceptives, you have to give them some props for standing up for their views and being assertive. Obviously human lives are more important to a company than money, so why is Hobby Lobby’s morality the one being questioned?