‘Trojan Women’ great despite interrupted rehearsals

February 26, 2011 Review Print Print
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Thursday evening, Feb 24, OCCC’s theatrical department proved the old adage “the show must go on.”

Despite interruption of rehearsals caused by recent snowstorms, and the last-minute replacement of one of the leading players, the production of “Trojan Women” took the stage at the Bruce Owen Theater.

The stage set with its strewn and broken porticos; classic music and ambient lighting were an effective way to set the atmosphere while the audience settled in.

A small distraction was one cast member dancing around and peeking from behind the curtain before the play began. That bit of unprofessional behavior changed the mood from serious to “seriously?”

Euripides wrote “Trojan Women” in 415BC. It was the third tragedy of a trilogy about the Trojan War. The Greek warriors have killed their men, their city is being burned, and the women of Troy are facing an uncertain future at the hands of their captors.

Hecuba is attempting to council the younger women although she herself is lamenting the loss of her husband and son.

Misty Red Elk gave strength and dignity to the role. Her extensive speeches were performed without a flaw, although in the first few moments, without much emotion. The wait was worth it, and as Red Elk settled comfortably into her role, the passion began to build. The perfectly timed chorus of “Trojan Women” joined in with her and all players seemed to hit their stride.

The masks worn by the cast members were an attractive and effective way of maintaining a blend of like expressions, familial intimacy, and anonymity. The costumes were very well done.

The cast did an excellent job in spite of the obstacles they faced.

Rachael Barry gave life to the betrayed Cassandra, and Amanda Edwards brought tears as Andromache saying goodbye to her child.

Kudos to Jolie Beth Boudreaux for doing so well after stepping into the role of Helen two weeks ago.

It is always a pleasure to watch Philip Aken perform, and his role as Menelaus was no exception.

Guest Director Rachel Irick is to be complimented on her success in putting this play together.

Rating: A

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