Siri a welcome addition to iPhone addict’s life

February 13, 2015 Review Print Print
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SiriSince I got my first data plan I’ve been one of those people who will quickly and aptly use Google in a discussion or disagreement wherever 3g coverage may be found, because why not know  something when, at the touch of a button, you can be right?

A famous author or something like that once said that nothing is more frustrating than a good example.

That person is right. When you haven’t researched whatever you’re debating well enough, Google can help you prove your point in about 30 seconds. And Siri streamlines the process even more.

Siri came into my life when I upgraded to an iPhone 5s.The voice control on my iPhone 4 was incapable of even basic tasks, to the point where it would probably have been safer to use analog controls while driving.

During that transition, I felt like a tribesman in some forgotten corner of the world, brought forcibly and rapidly into the 21st century by the cold, invisible hand of globalization.

Then, I met Siri.

“Siri lets you use your voice to send messages, schedule meetings, place phone calls, and more. Ask Siri to do things just by talking the way you talk. Siri understands what you say, knows what you mean, and even talks back. Siri is so easy to use and does so much, you’ll keep finding more and more ways to use it,” according to www.siri.com.

Yes, Siri does work more often than she does not work, something I tend not to expect from technology.

Siri is not just functional, she is coy and playful.

I once asked her, “Siri, what is love?”Her reply was a stern, “I’m not going to go there, Grant.”

Once prompted on whether she could sing, she informed me she prefers to read poetry. How refined.

Upon my request to refer to me as ‘Snoop President’ instead of Grant, she was all too happy to comply. When I thanked her, she told me she was just doing her job, Snoop President.

You get the job done, Siri. I look forward to the conversations we will hold when the iPhone 10 comes out and you have evolved into speaking full sentences.

To contact Grant Swalwell, email onlineeditor@occc.edu

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